Tony Carlsen

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Tony Carlsen
Associate Professor

2010, Post-doctoral fellow, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
2008, Ph.D., Motor Control, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
2003, M.A, Motor Control, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
1998, B.H.K., Human Kinetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

MNT 352

Office: 613-562-5800 ext. 7081

Work E-mail: tony.carlsen@uottawa.ca
Twitter: @TonyCarlsenUO

Tony Carlsen

Biography

Tony Carlsen is an associate professor and the director and lead investigator of the NeuroMotor Behaviour Lab at the University of Ottawa. After completing his PhD in motor control at UBC in 2008, he worked for two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University in Chicago. He has been a professor in the School of Human Kinetics at the University of Ottawa since 2010 and his main research interests include determining the brain structures and processes involved in preparation for movement in humans, and how modulating this activity can lead to improvements in people’s lives.

Research interests

My main areas of interest are motor control, neurophysiology and neuromodulation. My lab also performs experiments that overlap with other areas such as motor learning and adaptation, sensorimotor integration and rehabilitation.

For example, we investigate:

  • Behavioural outcomes of processes related to preparation and initiation of actions
  • Neural contributions to motor preparatory processes
  • Brain stimulation techniques such as TMS and tDCS to modulate motor-related processes in healthy and motor-disordered individuals

Ongoing Research

“To date, my research has focused primarily on how one prepares quick actions that are completed in the absence of feedback. In the behavioural stream of this research, I have pioneered an emergent paradigm in the field of neuromuscular control in order to investigate response pre-programming that involves the use of an acoustic startling stimulus to involuntarily trigger prepared movements before they are initiated through voluntary response channels. This research has provided insight into when and under what circumstances we plan movements in advance. Secondly, in order to probe the brain activity and involved brain structures underlying these movements, my work employs neurophysiological methods and tools such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and EMG analyses. I also work with researchers in the use of EEG and fMRI. Finally, some of my work applies these techniques and findings to patients with Parkinson’s disease, in order to better understand how movement preparation is disrupted in disease states and to develop new interventions.”

Selected Publications

Recent Conferences and Presentations

  • Leguerrier A, Maslovat D, Carlsen AN (2016) EMG-EMG coherence reveals increased reticulospinal contributions to upper limb postural adjustments. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2016, Montego Bay, Jamaica.
  • Smith V, Carlsen AN (2016) Sub-threshold TMS applied over primary motor cortex does not facilitate startle reaction time even when controlling for timing of TMS application. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2016, Montego Bay, Jamaica
  • Hajj J, Carlsen AN (2016) Congruent auditory stimuli increase the proportion of correct responses in an inspection time paradigm. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2016, Montego Bay, Jamaica.
  • Drummond NM, Cressman EC, Carlsen AN (2015) Go-activation endures following the presentation of a stop-signal: Evidence from startle. Presented at SCAPPS 2015, Edmonton, AB.
  • Carter MJ, Carlsen AN, Smith V, Ste-Marie D (2015) Transcranial direct current stimulation applied to primary motor cortex dies not enhance the learning benefits of self-controlled KR schedules. Presented at SCAPPS 2015, Edmonton, AB
  • Hajj J, Maslovat D, Carlsen AN (2015) Intersensory facilitation effects explained using an additive activation model of initiation. Presented at SCAPPS 2015, Edmonton, AB.
  • Drummond NM, Cressman EC, Carlsen AN (2015) Startle reveals decreased preparatory-related activation during a stop-signal task compared to a simple reaction time task. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2015, Charleston, SC.
  • Carter MJ, Maslovat D, Nguyen M, Carlsen AN (2015) Learning a 90 deg relative phase bimanual coordination pattern: A tDCS investigation. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2015, Charleston, SC.
  • Leguerrier A, Maslovat D, Franks IM, Carlsen AN (2015) Responses to startling acoustic stimuli indicate that movement-related activation is constant prior to action. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2015, Charleston, SC.
  • Kennefick M, van Donkellaar P, Carlsen AN (2015) Cumulative activation effect predicts faster reaction times compared to startle-only related activity. Presented at Canadian Association for Neuroscience 2015, Vancouver, BC
  • Maslovat D, Chua R, Carlsen AN, May C, Forgaard CJ, Franks IM (2014) A startling acoustic stimulus interferes with upcoming motor preparation: Evidence for a startle refractory period. Presented at SCAPPS 2014, London, ON.
  • Carter MJ, Cseke B, Drummond ND, Carlsen AN (2014) Intentional phase transitions in bimanual coordination following tDCS. Presented at Neural Control of Movement 2014, Amsterdam, NL.
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